The anti-rape condom.

‘It hurts, he cannot pee and walk if it is on,’ she said. ‘If he tries to remove it, it will clasp even tighter. However, it doesn’t break your skin, and there’s no threat of fluid exposure.’ Ehlers said she offered her car and home to launch the project, and she planned to supervise the distribution of 30,000 free devices in cities hosting the World Cup soccer matches. Following the trial period, are going to available for about $2 apiece, according to CNN. ‘The mom of two daughters said she visited prisons and talked to convicted rapists to find out whether such a gadget would have made them rethink their activities,’ CNN reported.‘By funding these innovative study centres, we hope to make strides in getting rid of violence in our society and help Canadians overcome the devastating effects of violence on physical and mental wellness.’ The centres were selected through a funding competition run by CIHR’s Institute of Gender and Health . The successful projects were authorized through a rigorous, independent peer review process. Related StoriesDeaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHMESupporting people who have macular degeneration: an interview with Dennis Lewis, AMD Alliance InternationalElectronic smoking cigarettes and smoking cigarettes cessation: an interview with Professor Peter Hajek’We are proud to purchase health research directed at developing answers to violence, particularly gender-based violence,’ said Dr.